At least I know John Farnham believes in me.

They say if you don’t use it, you lose it. Skills have a habit of atrophying if they’re not flexed regularly. It’s such a waste. If you’ve spent time building them up, it’s important to find an outlet, keep them limber. Which is a roundabout way of saying that it felt pretty fucking great to be back in a voicing studio.

Don’t go getting your hopes up, it was in no way a major deal. Just a nice return to a familiar calling. I met with a guy in radio creative about a job that was up for grabs. I was interested to get back into radio, it’s an industry I’ve always loved. TV is fine, but my heart has truly never left radio. We talked about the job and he admitted that they’d already decided on who they wanted. Applying wouldn’t get me anywhere. He did however notice my accent and asked me if I’d done any voicing. I nodded and told him about my past career in audio production.

He thought for a second and told me about the nationwide company voice bank. There’s a directory of available voices for creatives to go through and find one that’s suitable. They list the type of reads that voices are good at (any accents or specific impressions) and have a few samples of their work. We had the same kind of system back home. It meant that if there was a prized voice in a small market the local producer could record them and send the audio up to another one. My current company didn’t yet have any New Zealand accents in the voice bank. The creative guy sent two scripts my way and brought me down to the studio.

Back when I worked in production, I didn’t do a heap of voicing. Part of it was pragmatic. I knew how to run Pro Tools and record. If I was recording it was easy to see how the read was running for time. I could hear it through the monitors and know if it fit the aim of the script. If I needed to record myself I’d often flick it to record, run into the booth, voice, then run out and stop the recording. It wasn’t the smoothest process, but it got the job done in a pinch. We also had a lot of conventional radio voices on station who got used way more often. This meant I got brought in whenever a weird little character voice was required. Aliens/monsters. Yoda. Impressions, mostly. Or a soft read for some kind of heart strings tugging cause. I always liked it, but would’ve loved to do more than I had the chance to.

I was of course a little rusty today, but not atrophied by any means. We did a bunch of takes, tried assorted reads trying to emphasise different parts of the scripts. We worked on pace and mood. I warmed up. It’s always easiest voicing when you’ve built up a relationship with the producer. You know what they’re looking for and they know how to get the type of read out of you they’re seeking. It was fun, I’d forgotten how much I’d missed it. Trying to properly articulate while also shaving five seconds off a read and emphasising correctly in all the right places. Being back in that booth felt like something clicked. Familiar and comforting. I’d like more of that feeling.

We’ll see if it goes anywhere. With people knowing my voice is available, they can write for it. Fingers crossed I can start building up a portfolio. If eventually I could start booking paid gigs, that’s not something I’d sneeze at. It’s pretty damn lucrative for work I’d enjoy doing. Fingers crossed, pray for Mojo.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s